Summer is now right around the corner, which can only mean one thing: taking the dog away for some much-needed sun, sea, and sand! 


To get there in one piece, though, it’s important that you understand how to transport your dog safely and comfortably. 


Whether you're embarking on a long trip into Europe or just a short drive down the road, Omni’s vets have some essential tips for travelling safely with your dog in the car.

 

1. Location, Location, Location 

Dogs are technically allowed to travel in the front seat in the UK, but it is not recommended by the Highway Code. If they are in the front seat, they must be suitably restrained (see point number 2) and you must be driving safely (as ever!). 

Before you get there, however, here’s a few points to consider: 

  • If your dog is travelling in the front seat, make sure to switch off the passenger airbags; they are designed for a human body shape, and may do more harm than good in the event of an accident. 
  • Keeping your dog in the boot can be a good option, too, though if they are anxious travellers or struggle to be away from their human, they may end up crying and be more of a distraction than anywhere else! 
  • If the dog is sitting by a window, make sure they are not able to hang out of it. While it looks cute, it is incredibly dangerous - an oncoming vehicle or tree branch may hit them, or they may decide to throw safety to the wind and chase another animal (or person) they see. Ensure your dog is restrained and the window is not wound down all the way. 

 

2. Show Some Restraint! 

Safety first. Just like us, dogs need proper restraints to stay safe in the car. There are a few options you can consider.

  • Doggy seat belts: These attach to your car's existing seatbelt system and connect to a harness on your dog. (Avoid connecting to a collar, as they may cause injury or strangulation at worst!)
  • Crates: A sturdy, well-ventilated crate in the boot can be an excellent option. Your crate should be large enough for your dog to stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably. A small crate can do more harm than good, as can a flimsy one.
  • Barriers: If your dog is sitting in the back seat, consider a pet barrier to keep them from jumping into the front seat and distracting the driver. Save the cuddles for the rest stops!

 

3.  It’s All About the Pit Stops

Dogs need regular breaks to stretch their legs, relieve themselves, and stay hydrated - it’s hard work being a passenger! Try to stop every 2-3 hours at most to go for a short walk and toilet stop. 


Always, always, always use a short lead during these stops, as there will be lots of cars in an unfamiliar environment. It’s so easy for your dog to get distracted, run off, and get lost or hit by a car. A dog should never be off the lead in a car park. 

 

4. Pack Your Essentials… And Your Dog’s!

  • Water and bowl: Keep a supply of fresh water and a portable bowl to keep your dog hydrated throughout the trip. Car interiors can get warm and dry on a long journey and your furry friend might get dehydrated without you knowing it. 
  • Food: Bring enough food for your holiday, and then some. We do smaller 2kg bags of Omni’s life stage diets that are perfect for adventuring with. They’re easier to carry and less likely to spoil. 
  • Treats: Treats can also be a wonderful reward and distraction for anxious companions, too. You can use treats to train your dog to be calmer in the car if they struggle with journeys; for this, we always recommend Omni’s Peaceful Dog Treats, full of calming valerian root and lemon balm herb.  
  • Toys and comfort items: Bring your dog's favourite toys and a blanket or bed to help them feel more at home in the car - and more comfortable, too! 
  • Poop bags and puppy pads: Accidents happen, and you never want to be caught short in the car of all places!

 

5. Comfort is Key

A comfortable car environment can help reduce your dog's stress and prevent motion sickness. Consider these tips:

  • Temperature control: Never leave your dog in a hot car, or unattended for long periods. Even with windows cracked, temperatures can rise quickly and become dangerously hot. If you have to leave them, turn on the air conditioning - but it’s best to just take them with you. 
  • Ventilation: Ensure your dog has plenty of fresh air. You can use window guards to safely allow windows to be partially open. Air conditioning can dry out the air of the car, leaving your dog panting for breath even if the temperature is okay. 
  • Drive safely and smoothly: you should be doing this anyway, of course, but it is even more important with a dog in the car that you drive as safely as you can. Quick stops or fast turns can unsettle your dog, causing motion sickness, confusion, and anxiety. 

 

6. Practice Makes Perfect

If your dog is not used to car travel, start with short, positive experiences well in advance of your big trip.

Start gently by taking short drives to fun destinations like the park or a friend’s house - and why not try our delicious one-a-day Stress & Anxiety supplements, complete with L-Tryptophan (which helps produce serotonin, the happy chemical), valerian root and passion flower to help calm their nerves during a stressful learning journey? 


If your dog is coping well, you can gradually increase the length of the trips. That being said, if they are visibly nauseous or worried in car journeys, consult your vet (or book in for a call with Omni’s vet team) who may be able to recommend some techniques or medications to make the journey more comfortable for everyone. 

 

7. Be Prepared for Emergencies

  • Veterinary Records: Include vaccination records and any medications your dog needs. You may need to seek veterinary attention en route, or at your destination – call your primary clinic to get your medical records emailed over ASAP if this happens so that any clinic you visit has all your dog’s files and can give them the best treatment possible. 
  • Preventative parasite treatment: As your dog spends more time outside enjoying nature, remember to make sure you have some form of parasite treatment in order to reduce the risk of ticks and other parasites they might come across.  

From all of us here at Omni, we genuinely hope you have a wonderful summer full of adventures with your 4 legged friends - and that our advice in this article keeps you both safe and secure in whatever you do! 


If you have any concerns about travel, or any non-urgent health concerns whilst you're away, remember our dedicated Omni veterinary team are always at hand to ease any concerns - just click this link to book in a chat with us.

FAQ

Ma i cani non sono carnivori?

I cani sono in effetti onnivori nutrizionali, come dimostrato da uno studio scientifico robusto pubblicato sulla ripensabile rivista Nature (1,2) in cui è stato dimostrato che hanno 30 copie del gene AMY2B responsabile degli alimenti a base vegetale.

Hanno anche evoluto intestini relativamente lunghi (21) (quasi quanto gli esseri umani) e superfici relativamente piatte sui loro molari (31, 22) che usano per digerire e masticare una gamma di alimenti.

L'idea sbagliata comune secondo cui i cani sono carnivori probabilmente derivano dal fatto che sono classificati nell'ordine carnivora, ma lo sono anche molte altre specie come orsi, puzzole, corpoli che sono onnivori e persino il panda gigante che prospera con una dieta a base vegetale ( 20).

La proteina vegetale è digeribile ai cani?

Assolutamente sì, gli studi che hanno esaminato la quantità di proteine ​​che possono assorbire da cibi a base di piante e a base di funghi come la soia e il lievito hanno dimostrato oltre il 75% di digeribilità che è alla pari con cibi a base di carne (23, 24, 34, 35 e 25).

Entrambe queste fonti proteiche contengono anche tutti e 10 gli aminoacidi essenziali (36, 37) che i cani devono prosperare.

Non c'è troppa fibra negli alimenti a base vegetale?

La quantità media di fibre in una dieta commerciale per alimenti per cani è compresa tra il 2-4%. La ricetta a potenza vegetale di Omni ha un contenuto di fibre del 3% che è alla pari con diete a base di carne.

Nel nostro sondaggio con oltre 200 proprietari di cani, il 100% ha riferito che la coerenza delle feci del loro cane era "normale" o "perfetta" e non c'erano segnalazioni di sconvolgimenti digestivi (dati in archivio).

Posso mescolare Omni con altre diete a base di carne?

Siamo orgogliosi che le nostre ricette siano nutrizionalmente complete e quindi includono tutto ciò che il tuo cane ha bisogno per prosperare. Ciò significa che Omni può essere alimentato come unica razione. Supportiamo anche pienamente un "approccio flessibile" come pranzi senza carne o usando Omni come mixer.

Ogni piccolo aiuta a portare alcuni dei benefici per la salute e l'ambiente della potenza vegetale ai tempi dei pasti. Mescolare omni con carne/pesce aiuterà ad aggiungere varietà alla dieta del tuo cane, aggiungendo ingredienti sani con un'impronta di carbonio relativamente bassa.

Il cibo a base vegetale può fornire gli acidi grassi essenziali di cui i cani hanno bisogno?

Tutti i grassi e gli oli essenziali di cui i cani hanno bisogno, tra cui gli omegas 3 e 6 si trovano in una varietà di cibi a base di carne e vegetale (31, 28).

La ricetta di Omni è ricca di fonti a base vegetale di questi nutrienti in modo che il tuo cane otterrà tutti gli elementi essenziali di cui hanno bisogno.

Sento molto sull'alimentazione di carne cruda, non è meglio?

Nutrire carne cruda ai cani è diventata una tendenza molto popolare negli ultimi anni, ma la maggior parte dei veterinari avvertirà da questa pratica. Questo perché il processo di cottura è fondamentale per aiutare a uccidere batteri pericolosi come E coli, Salmonella e Campylobacter (9) che hanno reso necessaria diversi richiami di cibo dal mercato e causato gravi malattie e persino morte sia nei cani che nei loro proprietari (40, 41 , E 42).

Ci sono anche diversi vermi e parassiti che vengono uccisi solo quando la carne cruda viene cotta. I cani sono cani, non lupi e grazie alla loro addomesticamento per migliaia di anni, per fortuna non hanno bisogno di cacciare per ottenere la loro grub né hanno bisogno di mangiare carne cruda, non vale solo il rischio.

Riferimenti

1. Buff P.R., Carter R.A., Bauer J.E., Kersey J.N. (2014) Alimenti naturali per animali domestici: una revisione delle diete naturali e il loro impatto sulla fisiologia canina e felina. J. Anim. Sci .; 92: 3781–3791. doi: 10.2527/jas.2014-7789


2. Axelsson E., Ratnakumar A., ​​Arendt M.L., Maqbool K., Webster M.T., Perloski M., Liberg O., Arnemo J.M., Hedhammar A., ​​Lindblad-Toh K. (2013) La firma genomica del dogesticazione per cani rivela Adattamento a una dieta ricca di amido. Natura; 495: 360–364. doi: 10.1038/natura11837


3. The European Pet Food Industry (FEDIAF) Nutrition [consultato il 3 giugno 2021] Disponibile online: http://www.fediaf.org/self-regulation/nutrition/


4. Gentle World Good Nutrition for Healthy Vegan Dogs [consultato il 3 giugno 2021] Disponibile online: http://www.webcitation.org/6ineizmnq


5. Peden J. (1999) Cati vegetariani e cani. 3a ed. Portanti di una nuova era; Troy, MT, USA


6. SEMP P.-G. (2014) tesi di master. Università veterinaria di Vienna; Vienna, Austria: nutrizione vegana di cani e gatti


7. Brown W.Y., Vanselow B.A., Redman A.J., Pluske J.R. (2009) Una dieta sperimentale senza carne ha mantenuto le caratteristiche ematologiche nei cani da slitta a scatto di sprint. Br. J. Nutr .; 102: 1318–1323. doi: 10.1017/s0007114509389254


8. Persone per il trattamento etico degli animali (PETA) Dog Health Survey. [Accesso il 3 giugno 2021]


9. Marks S.L., Rankin S.C., Byrne B.A., Weese J.S. (2011) Batteri enteopatogeni in cani e gatti: diagnosi, epidemologia, trattamento e controllo. J. Vet. Stagista. Med.; 25: 1195–1208. doi:


10. Carrión P.A., Thompson L.J., Motarjemi Y., Lelieveld H., (2014) Gestione della sicurezza alimentare: una guida pratica per l'industria alimentare. Academic Press; Londra, Regno Unito:. pp. 379–395


11. Knight, A. e Leitsberger, M. (2016) Diete vegetariane contro a base di carne per animali da compagnia. Animali 6, 57.


12. Boyer C.I., Jr., Andrews E.J., Delahunta A., Bache C.A., Gutenman W.H., Lisk D.J. (1978) Accumulo di mercurio e selenio nei tessuti di gattini alimentati con cibo per gatti commerciali. Cornell Vet .; 68: 365–374.


13. Anonimo. Il cibo per cani del tuo animale domestico potrebbe essere pericoloso. [Accesso l'8 dicembre 2014] Disponibile online: http://www.wavy.com/global/story.asp?s=1018127&nav=23iict4s.


14. Porecca K. (1995) Lettera personale a James Peden Re: Intervista dell'Università della California (Davis), della North Carolina State University e dei ricercatori dell'Università di Guelph che studiano la connessione tra cardiomiopatia e dieta dilatata


15. Perry T. Cosa c'è veramente per cena? [Accesso il 7 luglio 2016] Disponibile online: http://www.webcitation.org/6ipel5yvr.


16. https://www.bordercolliefanclub.com/bramble-the-vegan-dog-lives-to-189 anni/


17. https://aminoapps.com/c/vegan/page/blog/vegan-dog-lives-to-27 annis-of-age/n4ai_muare5qnoyvn1dn85ap0gvjz3j


18. https://v-dog.com/blogs/v-dog-blog/vegan-diets-for-dogs-what-about-longevity


19. https://www.fediaf.org/39-prepated-pet-foods/80-understanding-labels.html


20. https://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2016/07/vegan-dogs-a-healthy-lifestyle-or-growing-against-nature/

21. https://www.petmd.com/dog/nutrition/7-interesting-facts-about-your-dogs-digestive system

22. http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/Pathphys/digestion/pregastric/dogpage.html

23. Félix AP, Zanatta CP, Brito CB, et al. (2013) Digeribilità e energia metabolizzabile di soia grezzi fabbricati con diversi trattamenti di lavorazione e alimentati a cani e cuccioli adulti. J Anim Sci; 91: 2794–2801.


24. Carciofi A, De-Oliviera L, Valério A, et al. (2009) Confronto di semi di soia micronizzati con fonti proteiche comuni nelle diete a secco per cani e gatti. Anim Feed Sci Technol; 151: 251–260.

25. Yamka R, Kitts S, Harmon D. (2005) Valutazione di fagioli a basso contenuto di soia a basso contenuto di oligosaccaride e a basso contenuto di oligosaccaride in cibi canini. Anim Feed Sci Technol; 120: 79–91.

26. Hill D. (2004) Proteine ​​alternative nella nutrizione animale compagna, nei procedimenti. Pet Food Assoc Canada Fall Conf; 1–12

28. HAZEWINKEL HA, Tryfonidou MA. (2002) Metabolismo della vitamina D3 nei cani. Mol Cell Endocrinol; 197: 23–33.
Boland R, Skliar M, Curino A, et al. (2003) composti di vitamina D nelle piante. Plant Sci; 164: 357–369.

29. Jäpelt RB, Jakobsen J. (2013) Vitamina D nelle piante: una revisione di occorrenze, analisi e biosintesi. Front Plant Sci; 4: 136

30. Knight, A. e Leitsberger, M. (2016). Diete vegetariane contro a base di carne per animali da compagnia. Animali 6, 57.

31. Dodd SAS, Adolphe JL, Verbrugghe A. (2018) Diete a base vegetale per cani. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 1 dicembre; 253 (11): 1425-1432. doi: 10.2460/javma.253.11.1425. PMID: 30451617.

32. https://www.petmd.com/dog/wellness/evr_dg_how_long_do_dogs_live [consultato il 2 giugno 2021]

33. https://www.utep.edu/leb/pleistnm/stuff/stuff2.htm [consultato il 2 giugno 2021]

34. M S Martins, N K Sakomura, D F Souza, F O R Filho, M O S Gomes, R S Vasconcellos, A C Carciofi (2014) Brewer's Brewer's Lievizio e lievito di canna da zucchero come fonti proteiche per cani, J Anim Physiol Anim Nutr (Berl) 2014 Ott; 98 (5 ): 948-57. doi: 10.1111/jpn.12145.

35. Christina Golder, James L Weemhoff, Dennis e Jewell (2020) i gatti hanno aumentato la digeribilità delle proteine ​​rispetto ai cani e migliorano la loro capacità di assorbire le proteine ​​poiché l'assunzione di proteine ​​alimentari si sposta da fonti animali a vegetali 24; 10 (3): 541. doi: 10.3390/ani10030541.

36. Henkel J. (2000) Soia. Affermazioni di salute per proteine ​​di soia, domande su altri componenti. Consumo FDA; 34 (3): 13–15,18–20.

37. Yalçin, Sakine & Erol, H & Özsoy, Bülent e Onbaşılar, I. (2008) Effetti dell'uso del lievito di birra secchi nelle diete sulle prestazioni, tratti delle uova e parametri sanguigni nelle quaglie. Animale: un giornale internazionale di bioscienze degli animali. 2. 1780-5. 10.1017/S1751731108003170.

38. Rosser EJ (1993) Diagnosi di allergia alimentare nei cani. Journal of American Veterinary Medical Association; 203 (2): 259-262.

39. Mueller RS, Olivry T, Prélaud P. (2016) Argomento valutato in modo critico sulle reazioni alimentari avverse degli animali da compagnia: fonti di allergeni alimentari comuni in cani e gatti. BMC Vet Res.12: 9. Pubblicato il 12 gennaio 2016. doi: 10.1186/s12917-016-0633-8

40. https://www.kentlive.news/whats-on/shopping/salmonella-fears-spark-urgent-recall-4328262

41. https://www.food.gov.uk/news-alerts/alert/fsa-prin-31-2020

42. L. Martinez-Anton, M. Marenda, S.M. Firestone, R.N. Bushell, G. Child, A.I. Hamilton, S.N. Long, M.A.R. Le Chevoir (2018) Indagine sul ruolo dell'infezione da Campylobacter nella sospetta poliradiculoneurite nel cane


43. https://www.foodsafetynews.com/2018/10/four-stec-infections-one-person-dead-after-exposure-to-raw-pet-food/

44. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/jan/12/scientists-criticise-rend-for-maw-meat-pet-food-after-analysis-finds-pathogens

45. https://news.cancerresearchuk.org/2015/10/26/processed-meat-and-cancer-what-you-need-to-kno

46. ​​D.F. Merlo, L. Rossi, C. Pellegrino, M. Ceppi, U. Cardellino, C. Capurro, A. Ratto, P.L. Sambucco, V. Sestito, G. Tanara, V. Bocchini (2008) Incidenza del cancro nei cani da compagnia: risultati del registro dei tumori animali di Genova, Italia
https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-1676.2008.0133.x, Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

47. https://www.pfma.org.uk/_assets/docs/white%20papers/pfma-obesity-report-2019.pdf

48. https://www.pfma.org.uk/Grain-Free-Factsheet

49. https://fediaf.org/images/fediaf_nutritional_guidelines_202020_20200917.pdf

50. https://www.ksvdl.org/resources/documents/dcm-forum/confidental-abstract-for-release-october-14-2020-final.pdf

51. https://www.ksvdl.org/resources/documents/dcm-forum/dcm-forum-solomonopening-remarks.pdf

52. https://stpetersbark.com/finally-theres-no-evidence-linking-grain-free-diets-and-non-hereditary-heart-conditions-in-dogs/

53. Okin GS (2017) Impatti ambientali del consumo di cibo da parte di cani e gatti. PLOS ONE 12 (8): E0181301. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0181301

Leggi altre domande